Badges

Badges

The wearing of a badge to show pride in membership has a long tradition within Australia’s trade unions. The design usually incorporated tools of the trade or an emblem equally symbolic. Badges were often produced to mark anniversaries and notable events. 

Early records show that on Eight Hour and Labour Day unionists wore identifying emblems, usually in the form of different coloured ribbons or rosettes. The image on the left shows assorted ribbons from the Australian Boot Trade Employees' Federation, Victorian Branch. (Source: N42-147.tif. Australian Boot Trade Employees’ Federation, Victorian Branch, N42/147)

Images

A - Australian Boot Trade Employees’ Federation, Victorian Branch,

Early records show that on Eight Hour and Labour Day unionists wore identifying emblems, usually in the form of different coloured ribbons or rosettes.

Source: Australian Boot Trade Employees’ Federation, Victorian Branch, N42/147

B - Australian Boot Trade Employees’ Federation, Victorian Branch committee members with their banner on Eight Hour Day, ca. 1910

Source: Australian Boot Trade Employees’ Federation, Victorian Branch, E141/18

C - Various unions

1. Federated Engine Drivers’ and Firemen’s Association of Australasia (1908-1992)

2. Blacksmiths’ Society of Australia (1954-1965)

3. Sheet Metal Working Agricultural Implement & Stove Making Industrial Union of Australia (1945-1972)

4. Operative Painters’ and Decorators’ Union of Australia (1918-1993)

5. Australian Builders’ Labourers’ Federation (1911-1972)

6. Federated Shipwrights’ and Ship Constructors’ Association of Australia (1933-1976)

Source: Trade Union Miscellany, Noel Butlin Archives Centre: P112/10